How to Place a Suprachoroidal Microstent

By Soosan Jacob, MS, FRCS, DNB
 

The CyPass Micro-Stent (not FDA approved; Transcend Medical) is a microinvasive glaucoma surgical device that is implanted into the supraciliary space via an ab interno approach. The device is made of polyimide and measures 6.35 mm in length, with a 300-μm lumen and 76-μm fenestrations along its distal end. It can be used in eyes with mild to moderate open-angle glaucoma. Implantation can be combined with cataract surgery.

The stent creates a cyclodialysis cleft, allowing aqueous outflow to the supraciliary space. IOP decreases as a result of the increase in uveoscleral outflow. Complications associated with the stent are mild and include transient hypotony and a transient IOP increase.1

As with other microinvasive glaucoma surgical devices, implantation of the CyPass requires the surgeon to be familiar with how to use the gonioscope intraoperatively. In his video, Iqbal Ike Ahmed, MD, demonstrates how to implant the CyPass into the supraciliary space. Dr. Ahmed also discusses how to position the stent just posterior to the scleral spur and advance the device until the proximal collar remains in the anterior chamber. n

Section Editor Soosan Jacob, MS, FRCS, DNB, is a senior consultant ophthalmologist at Dr. Agarwal’s Eye Hospital in Chennai, India. She acknowledged no financial interest in the product or company mentioned herein. Dr. Jacob may be reached at dr_soosanj@hotmail.com.

1. Rekas M, Nowak-Gospodarowicz I, Lewczuk K, Kosatka M. CyPass Micro-Stent implantation in combination with phacoemulsification: 1-year single-center experience in Warsaw, Poland. Paper presented at: The XXXII Congress of the European Society of Cataract and Refractive Surgeons; September 14, 2014; London, UK.

 

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